Communitas - Latin America

Steve Adams - Latin America Advancement Team Director

Latin America’s cities have a growing percentage of people who are highly educated and globally connected. They are postmodern, post-Christian, and secular in perspective. And while there are many reports of widespread growth in churches in Latin America, nearly all of it is among the less educated and less affluent groups of people. Christian Hooft, an Argentine lawyer and member of the largest fraternity of Argentine pastors, told us, “There is a new generation of young people in Buenos Aires who think totally differently, and our current churches are challenged as to how to reach them.”

sao paulo, brazil

Communitas in Latin America is passionately seeking to extend God’s kingdom, especially among the more educated people of the region. The goal is to invite these people into a relationship with Jesus, involve them in meaningful Christian community, and engage them in addressing the needs of the poor and marginalized that are prevalent in their countries. We want to see a vibrant, reproducing, kingdom-extending movement of churches in every major city of Latin America.

We believe that the Communitas history of ministry in Europe can be of great help. Postmodern, secular culture is the norm in Europe, so much of what we’ve learned there can be applied in Latin America as well. And our “Serve the City” initiatives that are so successfully addressing urban issues in Europe, are now being effectively adapted into Latin America.

So far, Communitas has helped establish churches in five Latin American cities: Brasilia, Brazil; Montevideo, Uruguay; Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Recife, Brazil; and São Paulo, Brazil.  We also have new “missional initiatives” at various stages of development in four other cities: Caxias do Sul, Brazil; Esterillos, Costa Rica; Guayaquil, Ecuador; and Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Our regional “Advancement Team” consists of Steve Adams (LatAm Director), Bryan & Terry Harms (oversight in Brazil), Marilyn Peters (HR Liaison), and Marty Uhler (oversight in Central America).